AI used in chat conversation analysis, major privacy invasion, or gift?

AI used in chat conversation analysis major privacy invasion, or gift?

Chat logs analyzers with Artificial Intelligence are on the rise defining matching among others interest, intents, attitude, opinions, personality and character with a score on likelihood. But what happens with this data in the future and did the counter party agree on this privacy statement when you exported your chat log with him or her? Do you think it’s time for a Personal AI Assistant, helping you with dating, relations and love in chat?

Read more about this topic at: https://www.wired.com/story/ai-apps-texting-flirting-romance/

Your TV is watching you, too

Your TV is watching you, too

Why TV sets are getting so cheap? James Carville said: it’s the data, stupid. TVs are in the lucrative business of harvesting and sharing your information. Americans spend an average of 3½ hours in front of a TV each day, according to eMarketer. Your TV records stores the history of your interests, personality, joys and embarrassments. Bad news is legally speaking, you gave your permission by accepting the privacy statement.

Read more about this topic at: https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/09/18/you-watch-tv-your-tv-watches-back/

Austria wants to register user name popular forums

Austria wants to register user name popular forums

If it is up to the Austrian government, names and address details of users of popular forums and websites will be registered from next year, so that their details can be requested from the relevant platform in the event of an investigation.

Users can still post comments under a pseudonym. With the bill, which should come into effect next year, the Austrian government wants to tackle anonymity on the web, said Gernot Blümel, Minister of Media Affairs. The law should apply to websites and forums with more than 100,000 registered users in Austria, or when the platform in Austria has a turnover of more than 500,000 euros per year or receives a press subsidy from the government of more than 50,000 euros.

Users must first enter their name, address and alias before they can post comments on a website or forum. Offering the option to respond anonymously is no longer permitted. It is up to the internet platforms to determine the identity of their users.

In addition to the bill, it is proposed to use two-factor authentication with the telephone number of the user. Since the beginning of this year, all SIM cards in Austria must be registered with the user’s proof of identity, reports Der Standard.

Read more about this topic at: https://www.derstandard.at/story/2000101677286/government-seeks-to-eliminate-internet-anonymity-with-severe-penalties

Polish privacy authority imposes first GDPR fine

The Polish data protection authority has for the first time imposed a fine on a company for violating the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPRG). The company, whose name is not mentioned, processed personal data obtained from public sources. It would be about 6 million records. The persons in question were not aware of this and were not informed by the company. “As a result, the data administrator has deprived them of the opportunity to exercise their rights,” said Urzad Ochrony Danych Osobowych, the Polish privacy regulator. He imposed a fine of 220,000 euros on the company.

Read more about this topic at: https://www.ceelegalblog.com/2019/03/pln-1-million-fine-for-gdpr-violation/?

Millions of Facebook passwords exposed to FB employees

The passwords of millions of Facebook users were accessible by up to 20,000 employees of the social network. Security researcher Brian Krebs broke the news about data protection failures, which saw up to 600 million passwords stored in plain text. Most of the people affected were users of Facebook Lite, which tends to be used in nations where net connections are sparse and slow.

Read more about this topic at: https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-47653656

ICO fines Kent pensions for sending nearly 2 million spam emails

Grove Pension Solutions Ltd which relied on ‘misleading’ professional advice has been fined £40,000 by the Information Commissioner’s Office for being responsible for sending nearly two million direct marketing emails without consent. The ICO has fined the pensions company under PECR.

Read more about this topic at: https://ico.org.uk/about-the-ico/news-and-events/news-and-blogs/2019/03/ico-fines-kent-pensions-company-for-sending-nearly-2-million-spam-emails/

European Parliament approves copyright rules

Platforms like YouTube and Facebook to a set of new obligations to strike licensing deals and face new obligations to monitor their sites for any copyright-infringing content and removing any that falls under those licensing deals.. “Today’s vote ensures the right balance between the interests of all players — users, creators, authors, press — while putting in place proportionate obligations on online platforms,” the Commission said after the vote. “The Directive will improve the position of creators in their negotiations with big platforms which largely benefit from their content.”

Read more about this topic at: https://www.politico.eu/article/european-parliament-approves-copyright-reform-in-final-vote/

Concerned citizens call the European Parliament on Article 13

In the past two weeks, more than 1200 citizens have called European Members to convince them to vote against the proposed new copyright rules. They did this via the website Pledge2019.eu, a campaign website.

With less than two weeks to go to the final vote only the European Parliament can stop the upload filter. On the upload filter in the European Parliament, more than 100 Members of the European Parliament have declared through Pledge2019 to vote against Article 13 of the proposed copyright directive.

Read more about this topic at: https://pledge2019.eu/en

Online safety education for 4-7 year olds

In 2018, 25% of their parents said they were worried about children giving out details to inappropriate people online – a rise from 18% the previous year. Children aged four to seven are now being targeted in a new online video campaign from the National Crime Agency (NCA). The series of videos called Jessie & Friends is intended to teach children how to keep themselves safe online, with a view to protecting them from sexual abuse and other threats.

Episode 1 – Watching Videos
Episode 2 – Sharing Pictures
Episode 3 – Playing Games

Do you think this will help create awareness and keep the children safe online?

Read more about this topic at: https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-47553456